Transplant Services



Specializing Institutions

Organ transplantation is the moving of an organ from one body to another with the purpose of replacing a patient’s damaged or absent organ. Organs that can be transplanted are the heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, pancreas, intestine and thymus. Tissue transplants also exist. Some of the most commonly transplanted tissues are bones, tendons, corneas, skin, valves and veins. The kidneys are the most commonly transplanted organs, followed closely by the liver and the heart. Not everyone is a good candidate for an organ transplant. Patients with infection, heart disease, drug or alcohol problems are not good organ transplant candidates. Organ transplants have been done in the United States since the 1950s. Today, transplants are more successful than ever. There are currently more than 100,000 people in the U.S. waiting for an organ.

There are many highly skilled transplant surgeons at The South Texas Medical Center. Our partner institutions that specialize in transplants offer advanced transplant services, perform pioneering research and foster a community of transplant survivors, donor families, specialists and social workers to support patients every step of the way. We also host the only living liver transplant facility in Texas. A living donation provides significant benefits to the patient starting with a shorter wait and an improved organ transplantation rate.

Transplant services at the South Texas Medical Center include bone marrow, kidney, liver, pancreas, heart, lung and adult stem cell transplants. Our institutions have exceptional patient outcomes and consistently meet and exceed nation averages. Institutions also offer pediatric transplant programs specializing in kidney and liver transplants. Transplant patients receive life-long care at the South Texas Medical Center.

Transplant Articles

  • British Ebola survivor flies to United States for blood donation

    By Reuters Staff

    (Reuters) - A British man who survived Ebola after being treated in London has flown to the United States to try to help another patient suffering from the virus, the Foreign Office in the United Kingdom said on Thursday.

    Media reports said William Pooley planned to donate his blood, which likely contains protective antibodies that could help fight the disease, for an emergency transfusion to an Ebola patient in Atlanta.

    An American doctor who worked for the World Health Organization is being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after he became infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone.

    A spokesman for the Emory hospital would not confirm on Thursday whether the doctor, who has not been named, will be getting blood donated from the British man, citing patient privacy laws.

    There are two Ebola patients being treated in the United States. A spokesman for the Nebraska hospital where another American is receiving care for the virus said the British man was not headed to that facility.

    Pooley, 29, contracted the disease while working as a volunteer nurse in Sierra Leone. He was discharged earlier this month from a special isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London after 10 days of treatment with the experimental ZMapp drug.

    London's Evening Standard newspaper said Pooley and the doctor he is hoping to help were reported to be close friends after working together at the Ebola treatment center in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

    The pair has the same blood type, which made Pooley the perfect donor, the newspaper said.

    There is no proven cure for Ebola, a deadly virus that was discovered nearly 40 years ago in the forests of central Africa. The worst-ever outbreak on record of the virus, which has killed at least 2,630 people in West Africa, has triggered a scramble to develop the first drug or vaccine to treat it.

    Earlier this month at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Dr. Rick Sacra received a plasma infusion from another American Ebola survivor, Dr. Kent Brantly. Brantly's blood likely contained protective antibodies that doctors said could help buy Sacra some time while his body worked to fight off the infection.

    Brantly's blood type also turned out to be a match for his friend and fellow missionary Sacra.

  • British Ebola survivor flies to United States for blood donation

    By Reuters Staff

    (Reuters) - A British man who survived Ebola after being treated in London has flown to the United States to try to help another patient suffering from the virus, the Foreign Office in the United Kingdom said on Thursday.

    Media reports said William Pooley planned to donate his blood, which likely contains protective antibodies that could help fight the disease, for an emergency transfusion to an Ebola patient in Atlanta.

    An American doctor who worked for the World Health Organization is being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after he became infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone.

    A spokesman for the Emory hospital would not confirm on Thursday whether the doctor, who has not been named, will be getting blood donated from the British man, citing patient privacy laws.

    There are two Ebola patients being treated in the United States. A spokesman for the Nebraska hospital where another American is receiving care for the virus said the British man was not headed to that facility.

    Pooley, 29, contracted the disease while working as a volunteer nurse in Sierra Leone. He was discharged earlier this month from a special isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London after 10 days of treatment with the experimental ZMapp drug.

    London's Evening Standard newspaper said Pooley and the doctor he is hoping to help were reported to be close friends after working together at the Ebola treatment center in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

    The pair has the same blood type, which made Pooley the perfect donor, the newspaper said.

    There is no proven cure for Ebola, a deadly virus that was discovered nearly 40 years ago in the forests of central Africa. The worst-ever outbreak on record of the virus, which has killed at least 2,630 people in West Africa, has triggered a scramble to develop the first drug or vaccine to treat it.

    Earlier this month at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Dr. Rick Sacra received a plasma infusion from another American Ebola survivor, Dr. Kent Brantly. Brantly's blood likely contained protective antibodies that doctors said could help buy Sacra some time while his body worked to fight off the infection.

    Brantly's blood type also turned out to be a match for his friend and fellow missionary Sacra.

  • British Ebola survivor flies to United States for blood donation

    By Reuters Staff

    (Reuters) - A British man who survived Ebola after being treated in London has flown to the United States to try to help another patient suffering from the virus, the Foreign Office in the United Kingdom said on Thursday.

    Media reports said William Pooley planned to donate his blood, which likely contains protective antibodies that could help fight the disease, for an emergency transfusion to an Ebola patient in Atlanta.

    An American doctor who worked for the World Health Organization is being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after he became infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone.

    A spokesman for the Emory hospital would not confirm on Thursday whether the doctor, who has not been named, will be getting blood donated from the British man, citing patient privacy laws.

    There are two Ebola patients being treated in the United States. A spokesman for the Nebraska hospital where another American is receiving care for the virus said the British man was not headed to that facility.

    Pooley, 29, contracted the disease while working as a volunteer nurse in Sierra Leone. He was discharged earlier this month from a special isolation unit at the Royal Free Hospital in London after 10 days of treatment with the experimental ZMapp drug.

    London's Evening Standard newspaper said Pooley and the doctor he is hoping to help were reported to be close friends after working together at the Ebola treatment center in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

    The pair has the same blood type, which made Pooley the perfect donor, the newspaper said.

    There is no proven cure for Ebola, a deadly virus that was discovered nearly 40 years ago in the forests of central Africa. The worst-ever outbreak on record of the virus, which has killed at least 2,630 people in West Africa, has triggered a scramble to develop the first drug or vaccine to treat it.

    Earlier this month at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Dr. Rick Sacra received a plasma infusion from another American Ebola survivor, Dr. Kent Brantly. Brantly's blood likely contained protective antibodies that doctors said could help buy Sacra some time while his body worked to fight off the infection.

    Brantly's blood type also turned out to be a match for his friend and fellow missionary Sacra.